When you think of ticks, you probably don't react the same way you do when you think of mosquitoes or spiders. All these pests drink blood, but ticks take this concerning experience a step farther-they latch into your skin.

Nobody wants to ever have a tick on their bodies. However, you risk attracting one of these pests every time you step outside. But you shouldn't hide in your house just to avoid them. Know how to deal with these pesky miniature arachnids by reading through the information below.

When you think of ticks, you probably don't react the same way you do when you think of mosquitoes or spiders. All these pests drink blood, but ticks take this concerning experience a step farther-they latch into your skin.

Nobody wants to ever have a tick on their bodies. However, you risk attracting one of these pests every time you step outside. But you shouldn't hide in your house just to avoid them. Know how to deal with these pesky miniature arachnids by reading through the information below.

Should You Feel Concerned When a Tick Bites You?

In most cases, ticks have harmless bites. They will only cause annoyance because ticks stay attached to your skin and continue to drink, where mosquitoes and spiders run away.

However, if you have a tick allergy, you may experience symptoms like the following:

  • Pain and swelling around the bite
  • Rash and blisters
  • Burning sensation
  • Breathing difficulty

Additionally, the tick may have carried an illness, like Lyme disease. Lyme disease's symptoms include:

  • An expanding rash that eventually forms a ring and can have a bull's eye appearance
  • Some burning or itching around the rash
  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Headache

The infection in the rash may spread and cause more serious medical problems if you do not get treatment immediately. As soon as these symptoms appear, consult your healthcare provider.

What Should You Do When a Tick Bites You?

As soon as you notice a tick in your skin, take these steps to remove it:

  • Use tweezers with a fine tip to grab the tick as close to your skin as you can.
  • Pull upward gently, but firmly. Do not turn your tweezers or you could break off the tick's mouth parts.
  • If the mouth does come off, try to remove it with your tweezers. Let your skin heal and monitor the area for infection or Lyme disease.
  • After you remove the tick, clean the bite with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.
  • Do not crush the tick with your fingers if it still lives. Drown it in rubbing alcohol or seal it in a bag or tape before you crush it.

Before you forget, write down the tick's size, color, and other traits. You may need this information later if you develop a complication from the bite. Take pictures if you can.

How Do You Prevent Tick Bites?

Even if you know how to handle a tick bite, you likely still want to avoid one. Use the guide below to decrease your risk for attracting a tick:

  • Cover yourself with as much clothing as possible when you go outside. Wear long sleeves and pants, and tuck your pant legs into your socks. Wear a hat for extra protection.
  • Wear strong insect repellent and apply it according to the label.
  • Examine your pets for ticks after they return inside. Ticks can move from animals to humans.
  • Call a pest control expert to thin the tick population on your property. This process may involve removing leaves, grasses, and underbrush. You may also have to remove wood piles and any other places that ticks might hide. Your exterminator can advise you further. Afterward, he or she may use chemicals or other means to keep the number of ticks under control.

If you have any further questions about how to handle the ticks in your backyard, talk to your pest control company. They can examine your yard and give you personalized advice on what to do next. Additionally, if you do not know what kind of insect has bitten you and want to ensure it wasn't a tick, check out our blog post on bite identification.

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